1651-2001
350th Anniversary of
Natick, Massachusetts and the
Natick Praying Indians
A private web page by A. Richard Miller
48614 visits since 010420; last updated 120116.

Also see the official web site of the Praying Indians of Natick and Ponkapoag.

Eliot and Indians memorial panel on Congregational Assoc. Building, 14 Beacon St., Boston, MA (courtesy Jan Prescott)Click for detail - John Eliot Preaching to the Indians in Main Rotunda, State House, Boston, MA (photo by A.R.Miller)

Natick's Town SealIn 1651 the Massachusetts Legislature granted Natick ("Place of Hills") as the home of a major group of Reverend John Eliot's converted Native Americans, brought together from various tribes in eastern Massachusetts. These Natick Praying Indians and Eliot, their original leader, developed the Natick Dictionary and the first Native American written language, and used them to create The Natick Bible ("Up Biblum"), the first Bible printed for Indians (James Quannapohit, a.k.a. James Rumneymarsh, a.k.a. James the Printer). They produced the first Native American minister, Daniel Takawambpait. The Praying Indians remained friends of the English settlers and arguably saved the Massachusetts Bay Colony during King Philip's War (1675-76), yet received harsh treatment during and after that uprising. Their descendants still reside in eastern Massachusetts, and Natick welcomes them back for its (their!) 350th Anniversary.

A. Richard (Dick) and Jill Miller of Natick are creating this Web page with help from a lot of friends, including the Natick Praying Indians under Caring Hands, their Clan Mother. We are delighted to find this small tribe of Native Americans still practicing the blend of Puritan and traditional teachings that their forefathers and John Eliot evolved 350 years ago!

We are working to give the Natick Praying Indians their own presence on the Internet. Meanwhile, this site can serve to welcome them back to Natick, and to tell interested readers a little about them and their participation in the Natick 350th Anniversary events.

*     Wunneyeu Neekin Kesukok Natick!     *     Happy Birthday, Natick!     *



Natick Praying Indian events (2009):
September 26th-27th, Cochituate State Park (10AM-5PM).
     Natick Powwow; Harvest Moon and Creator Praise Celebration
     Hosted by the Praying Indians of Natick and Ponkapoag.
     Singing; dancing; storytelling; food and more! Public welcome. Free admission.

Natick Praying Indian events (2008):
September 13th, Natick Town Common. Natick Days.
September 27th-28th, Cochituate State Park (10AM-5PM).
     Natick Powwow; Harvest Moon and Creator Praise Celebration
     Hosted by the Praying Indians of Natick and Ponkapoag.
     Singing; dancing; storytelling; food and more! Public welcome. Free admission.

Natick Praying Indian events (2007):
September 8th, Natick Town Common. Natick Days.
September 29th-30th, Cochituate State Park (10AM-5PM).
     Natick Powwow; Harvest Moon and Creator Praise Celebration
     Hosted by the Praying Indians of Natick and Ponkapoag.
     Singing; dancing; storytelling; food and more! Public welcome. Free admission.
      (orange bulletNews beforeorange bulletNews after.)

Natick Praying Indian events (2006):
September 9th, Natick Town Common. Natick Days.
September 23rd-24th, Cochituate State Park.
     Natick Powwow; Harvest Moon and Creator Praise Day Celebration
     Hosted by the Praying Indians of Natick and Ponkapoag.

Natick Praying Indian events (2005):
September 10th, Natick High School Football Field. Natick Days.
September 24th-25th, Cochituate State Park.
     Natick Powwow; Harvest Moon and Creator Praise Day Celebration
     Hosted by The Praying Indians of Natick
     Tribal Historical Event: First Praying Indian Powwow in 354 Years!
     Singing; dancing; storytelling; food and more! Public welcome. Free admission.

Natick Praying Indian events (2004):

September 25th-26th, Cochituate State Park.
     Intertribal Council of Tolba Menahan:
     Harvest Moon Festival and Pow-Wow
     in Cochituate State Park (10AM-5PM).

Natick Praying Indian events (2003):
  April 12th, South Natick, participating in
     Natick Indian Plantation Minute and Militia Companies
     Patriots' Day Encampment
     (Bacon Library, South Natick; 1 PM Saturday
     to 7 AM Sunday).
  April 26th at the New England Folk Festival
     (Natick High School; 1:00 PM Saturday,
     in the Auditorium). This is their (and perhaps
     any local Native-American) second group
     performance at NEFFA!Harvest Moon Pow-Wow, Oct. 7th 2001 at Cochituate State Park. (Click to enlarge)
  September 27th-28th with other tribes at annual
     Harvest Moon Pow-Wow in Cochituate State Park
     (10AM-5PM).

Natick Praying Indian events (2002):
  January 31st, 2002 at Memorial School in South Natick:
     2nd-grade presentation by Caring Hands and friends
     (photos by Maxine Klein of Memorial School).
  April 13-14th, South Natick, participating in
     Natick Minutemen Patriots' Day Encampment
     (Bacon Library, South Natick; 1 PM Saturday
     to 7 AM Sunday).
  April 20th at the New England Folk Festival
     (Natick High School; 11:30 AM Saturday,
     in the Natick Room). This is their (and perhaps
     any local Native American) first group
     performance at NEFFA!
  April 22nd, Natick Selectmen after 7PM. Natick
     Praying Indians, the Natick Historical Commission and
     others asked that the name of Pegan Cove Park be
     left intact in honor of the Pegan family, an original
     Praying Indian family of Natick. (Instead, the Natick
     Selectmen voted to ask their legislators to change the
     name to Tony Anniballi Memorial Park at Pegan Cove.)
  October 12th-13th with other tribes at annual
     Harvest Moon Pow-Wow in Cochituate State Park
     (10AM-5PM).

Natick Praying Indian events (2001):4th of July Float, at Natick's 350th Anniv. (Click to enlarge)
  June 6th at TCAN ("The Outspoken Word",
     story-telling).
  July 4th drumming in Natick's 350th-
     Anniversary parade, with Caring Hands
     as a Grand Marshal.
  July 18th at the Natick Morse Institute
     Library (7PM historical talk).
  October 6th-7th with other tribes at annual
     Harvest Moon Pow-Wow in Cochituate State Park
     (10AM-6PM).
  October 14th at Eliot Church in South Natick:
     A special Sunday service with Caring Hands.
     (This church was founded by John Eliot and the
     Natick Praying Indians
, 350 years ago.)
  
   
Natick 350th Newsletter

"Many crows make much noise, but it takes only one to bring the message."
-- Caring Hands, Clan Mother of the Natick Praying Indians

Natick Praying Indian history:

orange bulletOur History (Natick Praying Indians)
  History of Natick (by Natick Historical Society)
orange bulletJohn Eliot, "Apostle to the Indians"
orange bulletWhen Deer Island Was Turned Into Devil's Island, by Jill Lepore (Bostonia Magazine, Summer 1998).
orange bulletWhole History of Grandfather's Chair; True Stories From New England History, 1620-1808, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, 1841. In "Grandfather's Chair: A History for Youth", read about John Eliot and the Natick Praying Indians in these chapters: The Quakers and The Indians, The Indian Bible and Appendix to Part I.
orange bulletNatick Established; Feb. 19, 1781 (Mass. Moments - You can subscribe for a daily Mass. Moment)
orange bulletA Natick Romance of Colonial Times (Bran and Lydia during King Philip's War), written about 1840 by William Bigelow.
  Capt. Tom Tray (King Philip's War and Deer Island)
  Natick Praying Indians in the American Revolutionary War (Marco Kaltofen)
orange bulletPraying Indians in the American Revolution (Robert D. Hall, Jr.)
  Crispus Attucks (PBS)
  Crispus Attucks (CAAI)
  Natick Indian Births to 1850
  Natick Indian Marriages to 1850
  Natick Indian Deaths to 1850
  Natick Praying Indian Burial Ground & Wamsquon Association Memorial Marker
  Praying Indians (a brief history by Libby Klekowski)
  New England Praying Indian Towns (list of Leo Bonfanti)
  Massachusetts Indian Tribes (excerpt from "The Indian Tribes of North America" by John R. Swanton)
  Massachuset History (by Lee Sultzman)

The Eliot Bible (Up-Biblum God; The Natick Bible):
orange bulletThe Dartmouth Copy of John Eliot's Indian Bible (1639): Its Provenance, by Dick Hoefnagel.
John Eliot and America's First Bible, by Dr. Herbert Samworth.
John Eliot's Indian Bible. Cambridge, 1663, 1665, 1685, University of California, Berkeley.
The Word; Striking Gold Among the Stacks, by Chad Galts.
More images of the Eliot, or Natick, Bible from U.S. Library of Congress, University of Pennsylvania, .

Massachuset-Natick-Wampanoag Language:
orange bulletThe Indian Grammar Begun: or, An Essay to Bring the Indian Language into Rules, for the Help of Such as Desire to Learn the Same, for the Furtherance of the Gospel Among Them, by John Eliot, 1666. (text; images; reprint)
The Natick Dictionary, by John Eliot (1903 USGPO edition "by James Hammond Trumbull", with introduction by Edward Everett Hale)
Wampanoag Electronic Text Project
orange bulletAn Introduction to Wampanoag Grammar

Other:
Natick song (orange bulletAudiolyrics) and 1984 album by Rick Lee, Natick songwriter
     (Note: Before the late 1990s, Rick and most of Natick thought the Natick Praying Indians had disappeared.)
Natick Passages, a poem by Elizabeth Donovan 
orange bulletAbout Powwows


Some Caring Hands holds Praying Indian version of the Lord's Prayer. (Photo courtesy Maureen Sullivan)words from today's Natick Praying Indians:
The first Christian town in America was "Natick", the Indian words for "My Home". It was created for the Natick Praying Indians. This "place of many hills" is the same Natick, Massachusetts in existence today. Also, the first Bible and book ever printed on American soil was in the Natick-Massachusett Indian language.
     Today the Natick Praying Indian Tribe, under the leadership of the Grand Squaw Sachem Silva and Clan Mother Caring Hands, contributes to the local community and beyond by educational sharing of its unique spiritual and traditional culture. In acknowledgement of the Creator's wishes, the Tribe strives toward healing contributions for the Great Tribe, the Tribe of the Human Race. It does so with "the ointment of understanding, necessary to all true healing." --Caring Hands Silva, Clan Mother
Natick Praying Indians
48 Tenth Street, Stoughton, MA 02072
Phone: unlisted
E-mail: PrayingIndians@natickprayingindians.org
Official web site: http://natickprayingindians.org/

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