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Maple sugaring hasn't changed THAT much since the Indians taught the settlers how. But the implements have. In the good old Colony days, they used wooden buckets like these brown ones. These Colonial-style spiles were made of sumac shoots, because the central pith is easily removed to make a tube. The clear, watery sap drips into each bucket -- faster in a good season, and as the tree warms in the sun.
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ExhibitPlus 070303SyrupingColonialStyle2 Maple sugaring hasn't changed THAT much since the Indians taught the settlers how. But the implements have. In the good old Colony days, they used wooden buckets like these brown ones. These Colonial-style spiles were made of sumac shoots, because the central pith is easily removed to make a tube. The clear, watery sap drips into each bucket -- faster in a good season, and as the tree warms in the sun.