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In another exhibit, Mashpee Wampanoag Indians demonstrate how their inland neighbors maple sugared before the white man arrived. Behind a log exhibit of Native American craftmanship, a young lady heats rocks in an open fire. (No, she's not burning the drum.) The log trough was hollowed by placing glowing coals into the log on the right, charring and hacking it into a holder for a lot of maple sap. Then it was scraped clean. Now, sap is being boiled by putting in hot rocks from the fire. The log would burn in the fire, but even birch-bark bowls can boil water by transferring the hot rocks into their liquid contents. Good idea!
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ExhibitPlus 070303SyrupingIndianStyle In another exhibit, Mashpee Wampanoag Indians demonstrate how their inland neighbors maple sugared before the white man arrived. Behind a log exhibit of Native American craftmanship, a young lady heats rocks in an open fire. (No, she's not burning the drum.) The log trough was hollowed by placing glowing coals into the log on the right, charring and hacking it into a holder for a lot of maple sap. Then it was scraped clean. Now, sap is being boiled by putting in hot rocks from the fire. The log would burn in the fire, but even birch-bark bowls can boil water by transferring the hot rocks into their liquid contents. Good idea!